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Brand Spotlight: Toyo Sasaki Glassware

Here at Unison we truly value the brands we work with and strive to showcase products that combine equal parts expert design + function. Today we’re spotlighting Japan-based Toyo Sasaki Glassware, a brand we’ve had a lasting relationship with and whose products continue to be a customer favorite.

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The Toyo Tumber Collection is available in 3 sizes with a matching pitcher, and is incredibly versatile. Serve anything from wine to cocktails or refreshing juices in these customer favorites.

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The Toyo Tumblers pair great with the Cubes Drink Rocks from Areaware, cooling down your cocktail without diluting your expertly mixed concoction.

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The Fino Tumblers have a simple-meets-exciting silhouette and are made using a patented glass-strengthening technique called Hard Strong®. This technique is synonymous with safety + durability, making this delicately designed glassware shatterproof and perfect for the dishwasher.

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The Rout Etch Collection fuses a clean-lined modern look with a fluid texture at the base and is available in a double old-fashioned, high ball and ice bucket. It’s a great addition to your home bar cart.

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Cheers to one of our favorite brands! Shop our full line of glassware from Toyo Sasaki here.

 

 

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Unison Q+A: Joslyn Villalpando of J.Villa Workshop

We recently hosted a Weaving Workshop using our scrap fabric with Joslyn Villalpando, founder of J.Villa Workshop. We talked to Joslyn about her practice, and how her love for teaching translated into hosting events, and what’s next for J.Villa Workshop.

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1. How long have you been teaching as J.Villa Workshop and how did it begin?

While teaching art for Chicago Public Schools, I was working on my thesis at the School of The Art Institute Chicago around creating community with craft and fiber art. After a long day of teaching and writing paper after paper for grad school, I was craving two things: time with friends and making art again, so I started hosting craft gatherings in my little Chicago condo with my friends. Each gathering, usually around a holiday, was paired with a cocktail and treat.

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For instance, I had a group for Valentines Day and we made block print cards, sipped a pink gin drink, and ate sugar cookies.  I love craft media; weaving, embroidery, macrame, etc. because of its implications of approachability and I love seeing what contemporary makers are doing with the traditional techniques.

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Curating a whole craft experience brings me so much joy so I started reaching out to various venues around Chicago to see if they’d be interested in hosting my craft gatherings that would involve them, in some way. I was pleasantly surprised that most are really into it and have fun coming up with the workshop with me! I’ve done some fun events with Bang Bang! Pie, Antique Taco and The Barrelhouse Flat.

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2. You teach a wide variety of workshops, including printmaking, weaving and embroidery. Do you have a favorite that you like to teach?

I love teaching each one for different reasons. Embroidery is so gratifying because I know how intimidating it can be for beginners and its fun to create an accessible workshop where people leave saying, “oh ok I can do this, I got this!” Weaving…that was my first love so I know my joy for that one comes through when I teach! I just love them all! 

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3. You also create custom weavings, how do you determine the color palette and patterning for those pieces?

I love creating custom weavings. I’m usually inspired by a color palette and I’ll stick with that for a weaving or two. I love switching it up between tight, laborious weavings with a more intricate design and textured, loose, minimal weavings. 

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4. What’s next for J.Villa Workshop?

I’m working to make J.Villa Workshop my full time job, this coming April will mark one year and I’m having so much fun continuing to come up with new gatherings! I started with a few contacts and venues who wanted to work together and those have each led me to new ones. I love collaborating with new makers, venues, and small business owners as my own business grows. I’ve found such a beautifully supportive community in Chicago and I’ll keep curating craft gatherings as long as people keep joining me! 

Learn more about J.Villa including upcoming workshops here

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Unison In Process: Inside The Humboldt Collection

Historic Inspiration for a Reimagined Bedding Collection

On the near-west side of Chicago lies a community that represents the very fabric of America—interwoven cultures marked by dynamic social change and overlapping styles, all evolving and thriving amidst a backdrop that’s notable as much for its historic landmarks as its decidedly urban charm.

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Centered around a sprawling, 207-acre park, the Humboldt Park neighborhood is one part fast-paced cultural hub, one part serene oasis in the midst of the modern bustle. It’s simultaneously classic and modern, diverse and determined, everlasting and yet always somehow new.

What could be better inspiration than that?

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Named for this historic community in our own beloved hometown, our Humboldt bedding collection is designed to reflect the area’s longevity and beautiful wear.

Inspired by the hand-woven look, unique texture, and 2-sided pattern of classic madras plaids, this bedding is as casually chic as a fresh-air picnic. Unison co-founder Robert Segal parlayed this inspiration into his original drawing for the pattern, and production designer Erica Lubetsky then translated that drawing into an engineered plaid.

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The result was a simpler, sleeker pattern—more modern in tone. Then, we scaled it up for a strong, graphic punch and got ready to convert the carefully considered design into a textile.

First, material: we selected yarn-dyed cotton in an oxford weave, to showcase the delicate blending of colors.

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The linens have a basket weave construction, which creates a checkerboard effect with white, producing a softer tone that is perfectly suited to a mellow-cool bedroom. To get the contrast just where we wanted it, we selected darker, more saturated yarns that would blend into the perfect finished hue.

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As a final detail, we engineered each side of the duvet with a lighter blue, asymmetrical stripe on one side, so that when the bed is made with covers turned back, a stripe appears on each end.

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Looks like you might actually start to enjoy making your bed in the morning.

Shop Humboldt Bedding 20% Off now thru 02/26, shop the White Sale here.

 

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Unison In Process: What is Matelassé?

What is Matelassé?

When you envision your dream bedroom, what description comes to mind? We’ll take beautiful, cozy, and plush. And, if it’s possible to fuse whistle-clean high style with a dash of homey goodness, we might be nearing perfection.

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Enter matelassé.

Developed in France in the late 18th century, the matelassé weaving or stitching technique was originally designed to imitate quilting. In fact, in its original French, the word “matelassé” (pronounced mat-luh-SAY) means “quilted” or “cushioned,” and the material was created to mimic the style of hand-stitched quilts made in Marseille.

By virtue of its pattern and weave, the technique achieves a padded appearance without any padding within the fabric. A single-ply, typically woven material, matelassé is often used for coverlets and decorative shams today.

A matelassé is made with either 3 or 4 sets of yarns, with 2 sets serving as the regular warp and weft yarns and the other set(s) as crepe or coarse cotton yarns. When woven together, these yarns are crisscrossed. And when finished, the crepes or cottons shrink, producing that defining, puckered detail.

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Sleeping In Style

The best matelassé will retain the hand-quilted look that has defined this material since its inception. Since it is thicker than a sheet-grade fabric, matelassé is quite durable and delivers a refined, tailored look.

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With a texture similar to a fine quilt or bubbly brocade, matelassé is often patterned in elaborate florals or (our personal favorite) simple geometrics. It is at once luxurious and easy to care for, with its strong weave and typically cotton material.

These factors add up to something we all value: stylish beauty. But its versatility is the characteristic that renders matelassé material so timeless. With its rich texture, it delivers depth and communicates style. But its clean, often neutral palette also makes it easy to combine with the overall look of any bedroom – whether clean and simple or bright and bold.

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At Unison, we source our matelassé duvets, shams, and coverlets from Portugal, where the textile trade dates back to the late 1700s. With a tradition of high-quality product delivered at fair prices, Portugal’s network of fine textile manufacturers is today considered among the most distinguished in the world.

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Our particular vendor has been working in matelassé for over 18 years—a deep and rich history that is stitched into the very fabric of our Himmeli bedding, which is produced on a jacquard power loom. The gorgeous, starburst-like pattern is selected through a controller—a computer that communicates stitch-by-stitch weaving instructions to the loom. These looms ensure a plush, hand-quilted look, while high-quality cotton delivers an elegant hand.

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So as you’re drifting off into sweet, stylish slumber, you can enjoy pleasant dreams of the rich traditions, caring hands, and impeccable designs that have contributed to your perfect tuck in.

Himmeli Matelassé Bedding is now 20% Off thru 02/26 shop the White Sale here

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Get Creative With Valentine’s Gifting

Stumped on what to get that special someone this Valentine’s Day? We’ve got plenty of great gift ideas, including a video tutorial with creative wrapping tips and tricks to impress your sweetheart.

Read on to see our picks + watch the video:

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Cube Drink Rocks, $40

The perfect accessory for the cocktail drinker in your life who likes to keep things neat. Pop these in the freezer and when you’re ready to serve up a drinks, they’ll keep it cold without diluting your cocktail.

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Trophy Brass Bar Jigger, $20

Measure out your spirits in style with the Trophy Brass Bar Jigger from experimental design studio, Umbra Shift. Double sided with 3 shot measurements, 1/2 oz, 1 oz and 1.5 oz it combines great design with functionality to boot, cheers Valentine!

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Sprinkles Red Apron, $30

Serve up your sweetheart with the Sprinkles Red Apron, designed by Chicago-based creative Alex Fuller. Made of 100% cotton, it’s a standout kitchen staple that will make your valentine dressed to impress.

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Rout Etch Double Old Fashioned Glasses, $16 each

Celebrate your love with stunning glassware that’s definitely cheers-worthy. Rout Etch Glassware fuses a clean-lined, modern look with fluid texture at its base, and is ready to showcase anything you’re mixing up!

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Virtu Cheese Knife Set of 4, $120

Sometimes Valentine’s Day can get pretty cheesy, but not too worry because this knife set is up for the task. Beautifully balanced in their clean-lined silhouette and carefully considered ergonomics, they make a striking addition to any entertainer’s table.

Shop our Valentine’s Gift Guide for more great gift recommendations!

Watch our video tutorial for some great wrapping ideas with our wrapping paper + washi tape:

Stay tuned for more tutorials on the blog and share the love!

Follow us on instagram: @unisonhome

Special thanks to  Potluck Creative  for the great video work!

 

 

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How It’s Made: Hand Printed Pillows

Here at Unison we’re committed to working with vendors that provide a high level of craftsmanship and quality products. Did you know our throw pillows are handprinted and sewn in the USA?

Read along to for an inside look at how are throw pillows, are made and now thru 01/14 enjoy 10% Off Throw Pillows with code EXTRA10

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The fabric for our throw pillows is made using a hand screen printed process. Large scale fine mesh screens are coated with a light sensitive emulsion. A transparency with the image to be printed is then exposed on the screen using an exposure unit.

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Water is used to rinse out the screen, clearing out the emulsion in the areas where the pattern was exposed, allowing for ink to pass through.

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After the screen dries, it is ready to print. Large buckets of ink are mixed and then poured on one end of the screen that sits on top of the fabric.

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The ink is then quickly pulled across the screen using a large squeegee, pushing ink through the screen’s open areas and producing our desired print. Because the screens are so large, it takes two people to pull the squeegee across the screen.

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This process is repeated down the remaining roll of fabric and once it’s dry, the next color may be layered on top. Once the printing is completed, the fabric is sent to our headquarters in Chicago for inspecting and then converted by a local sewing company into our line of throw pillows and table linens.

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Voila your pillow is complete!

Don’t forget to enjoy 10% Off Throw Pillows now thru 01/14, use code EXTRA10

 

 

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Stylist Feature: Janelle Gonyea

At our recent store event: Well-Fashioned Feast, we asked stylist extraordinaire Janelle Gonyea to bring her table styling tips and tricks to assist Unison customers with their own holiday entertaining. We chatted with Janelle about her background, style inspiration and how she entertains in her own home.

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Tell us a little bit about your background and how you became interested in styling:

I have always been interested in telling stories through creating beautiful color palettes and styled vignettes. I have an arts education, and that has informed much of my creative career. I began as an illustrator and graphic designer drawing and arranging items on a page. From there I moved onto arranging flowers and have since eased into styling objects in space.

My love for styling arose out of a fascination with storytelling. You see a scene and wonder what is happening there, and the objects begin to give you pieces of that story. It can take you back in time, recall a memory, or inform a brand’s aesthetic and lifestyle.

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We especially loved the handmade elements you added to the table, particularly your illustrations. Is that something you often incorporate into your table styling?

I certainly do! Adding handmade elements to styling gives it a more personal touch and adds more life to the table or scene. I think if it can be handmade, it should be! My education was in illustration, so it’s a skill that I love to embellish with when appropriate.

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How did the Unison products inspire you in creating your tablescapes?

Unison products are incredibly inspiring, especially because you really cannot go wrong with any combination. They defy rules, and encourage you to play. I adore the minimal patterns and limited color palettes, because they provide a foundation for incorporating your own style. By mixing and matching details you can be playful, dramatic, quirky, or romantic. 

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Styling for the holidays with Unison products gave me a chance to explore all of the pieces of place settings that I may not use on a regular basis.  I love having an opportunity to be expansive and really embrace table settings for multiple courses. Their cast iron collection was incredibly enticing, and I could just picture one at each place setting overflowing with an earthy homemade individual pot pie or ginger pear crisp!

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What was your main goal in executing each of your table settings? Do you often have an overarching concept for your tables that dictates your styling?

My main goal was to showcase various place settings and creative ways to play with napkin placement while adding personal elements. While some people tend to worry about them, I don’t believe in following all the rules. That being said, I wanted to provide a range in settings from basic to formal because the holidays tend to bring together traditions and honoring many generations.

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When styling tables, I am often drawn to particular palettes or ambiguous concepts like “desert landscape” or “wintry mountain” and build out from there. Florals always play a huge role, and I am still a fan of family style tablescaping and long communal tables. They’re more interactive and allow you to really play with settings and accompanying details.

What is your general philosophy regarding entertaining? Do you like to entertain within your own home as well?

I love bringing people together and sharing a meal over delightful conversation. With entertaining, I think atmosphere plays a huge role, and I like to create tablescapes that would set someone at ease and make them feel welcome. Recently I held a gathering on the night of a Supermoon, so I used a deep indigo runner accompanied by marble cake stands, milky white platters, speckled blue bowls and lunaria flowers. 

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Do you have any additional tips for last minute holiday entertaining prep?

I would say not to worry too much about the “rules” and just have fun with it. Be yourself and embrace your unique style. Beyond the essentials of table settings from lovely shops like Unison, consider adding a simple name tag for seating or drink labels. Handmade elements are always nice, and adding a small vase of flowers gives your table a warming touch.

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Textiles are a great way to lay a foundation for color, and have a transformative effect on any table setting. A simple white, black or grey plate set can look fun and quirky on a Market Plaid tablecloth or deep and dramatic on the Garland Wine Tablecloth. Holidays are the time to bring out all of the special details you might not use on a daily basis!

See more styling from Janelle Gonyea here

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Unison x The Weaving Mill

Here at Unison, we seek out and collaborate with an array of independent artists and designers, offering distinctive accessories, hard goods, and art that infuse homes with the clean beauty and functional substance of modern American design.

This year we’re especially excited about our most recent collaboration on a limited edition throw blanket with artists and co-founders of The Weaving Mill, Matti Sloman and Emily Winter. We sat down with Matti and Emily to learn more about their creative process and all things weaving. Read on to learn more and watch our video of the weaving in action!

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Briefly introduce yourselves

Emily: I grew up in San Francisco and moved to Chicago for college. I got my B.A. in History from University of Chicago. I started weaving right after I finished college, interning with Natalie Boyett at the Chicago Weaving School. I spent the next couple years working with her, teaching at Envision Unlimited and doing various odd jobs. I moved to Providence in 2013 for a Master of Fine Arts in Textiles at the Rhode Island School of Design. Matti and I overlapped for one year in the MFA program and hit it off.

Matti: I grew up in Boston and got my BFA (Painting) and MFA (Textiles) from RISD. I have worked for a number of artists over the years as a studio assistant, which informed my desire for a collaborative studio practice. After grad school, and before moving to Chicago, I participated in the Land Arts of the American West residency which expanded my understanding of the studio as a practice vs. a place.

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What is the history of The Weaving Mill?

The Weaving Mill is an outgrowth of the Chicago Weaving Corporation, a textile company that started in the 1940s. The CWC began in Wicker Park, moved to the suburbs in the mid 80s and in 2005 partnered with social services agency Envision Unlimited to create a job training program for adults with developmental disabilities.

I (Emily) worked at Envision Unlimited as a teaching artist and knew Jim, who ran the mill. When I was in grad school, I learned that he was retiring and that there weren’t any concrete plans for the textile equipment. I started talking with people at Envision and at RISD about the possibility of restarting the weaving program at West Town Center. I asked Matti if she would be interested in coming to Chicago to work on this together and she said yes, she would. We both moved to Chicago in the summer of 2015 and started cleaning up the workshop, learning the equipment, and teaching sewing classes to Envision’s clients.

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What is it about the art of weaving that you’re drawn to?

Textiles are always in some in-between territory, between art and design, utility and aesthetics. This makes it a really meaty medium to work in, because it always pushes a little bit against some of those conventions. We like that the fabric we make always moves into the world in ways we don’t anticipate.

Can you talk a bit about your residency program?

Hosting an artist-in-residence was a fundamental program of The Weaving Mill since our initial brainstorming conversations. We always imagined The Weaving Mill as a multifaceted organization. Looking towards The Fabric Workshop as an inspiration, we believe the integration of working artists into our studio and the art program at West Town Center would elevate everyone’s practice. We received a Propellor Fund grant last fall that has funded our pilot program. This summer, three artists, staying for a month each, have brought their studio practices and energy to West Town Center. Each artists contributes 16 hours of workshops for Envision Unlimited clients. The remarkable response to the workshops has solidified the importance of continuing the residency next year.

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Do you find weaving to be a fairly accessible medium for your students?

West Town Education for Textiles (W.E.F.T.) is our textile education program at West Town. We work with two groups of Envision clients twice a week, building up sewing skills. We work on cutting, measuring, design, and sewing machine skills. Our hope with this program is that participants will become comfortable with these skills and be able to use them in their personal lives and in the future, for paid production work.

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How did you begin working with Unison?

When we discussed The Weaving Mill prior to moving to Chicago with our RISD faculty, they would nod and whisper “you need to talk to the people at Unison,” as if they were giving us top secret stock tips. We have admired the level of design coming from Unison from afar, but it took Liz Collins, mentor, artist and former classmate of Unison Co-Founder Robert Segal, to give us the moxie to make contact. Eventually we hosted the team here to The Weaving Mill to geek out and talk weaving. Several months later, when Unison Production Designer Erica Lubetsky proposed this collaboration, we were beyond excited.

Shop the Unison x The Weaving Mill Throw Blanket here

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Have you partnered with other brands before? If so, which one(s)?

We are working in 3 realms right now: we do our own projects (TWM Projects), which are single-run editions of textile objects. We have done 3 of these projects so far (100 Blankets, VA! Jackets, and A Very Big Blanket) and have more coming up. We also work with artists to do more experimental yardage—this involves a process of collaborative sampling and really thinking about how to push the possibilities of our looms. We are currently working with Portland artist Sarah Wertzberger on a project, as well as Providence artist Jungil Hong. We do collaborative design and production work with other businesses—we have done projects with print designer Rebecca Atwood, apparel designer Jamie Hayes and artist Nuria Montiel (for Jamie’s line Production Mode), and textile studio Herron.

What is next for The Weaving Mill?

We recently had an exhibition at Wheaton College and we are working on the next TWM project (Navajo churro wool blankets), and we have a couple of collaborations cooking. Sign up for The Weaving Mail!

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How to Set a Table

We’ve all done it: you plan a dinner party and spend loads of time mapping out a menu, shopping for ingredients, and preparing the food, only to look around in a panic when the doorbell rings on the night of. Where are those blue linen napkins?! Are they still in the ironing basket? And what am I going to serve the salad in? Oh no. Did we ever find that missing salad tong?

In the end, there’s more to a great party than scrumptious tastes. Even the most elegant dishes can lose their luster if the mood and ambiance isn’t carefully considered—including the mood of that stressed-out hostess, who’s too busy wrangling her table linens to actually enjoy her guests.

Ah, the all-important table setting.

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Setting a table is not rocket science. But it is foundational, essential, and darn fun, when you approach it the right way.

The key to tapping into the fun? Good question. Here’s our 3-part answer:

  1. Don’t wait

Setting a table is an every day task. And the more you do it—and do it well—the less stressful it will become when it’s time to throw a gorgeous tablescape together for a special occasion.

So set your table for family dinner on a nightly basis. Use your tablecloths, napkins, special flatware, you name it. Don’t be afraid to break out the place cards or crystal candlesticks on a Tuesday with leftovers. It’s fun to get fancy in your PJs—and it’s a great way to play around with different looks and become comfortable with more formal settings.

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When you have a dinner party on the books, plan ahead. A few days before the shindig, try out a few table setting combinations, make your selections, and be sure all your linens and other items are spit spot and ready to rock.

On the day of the party, go ahead and set the table early on. It’s an easy task to check off the list before you even hit the kitchen. And a pre-set table adds a great sense of ambiance for guests as they enter your home.

  1. Know the basics

You can do a lot with a table setting. But certain basics are a must. So get them down pat, and then build from there.

Here are the essentials:

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  • Dinnerware: The star of the show. The dinner plate represents the main event and sits at the center of the individual place setting, with all the other elements placed around it. Additional items, such as salad plates, soup bowls, etc., should be added as the menu requires.

Shop Merchant Dinneware here.

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  • Flatware: The supporting cast. Every piece of flatware plays a key role. At the very least, you’ll want to include a dinner fork, knife, and spoon, placed from left to right in the order in which they’re used—fork to the left of the dinner plate; knife immediately to the right of the plate, sharp edge facing inward; and spoon on the far right. Add additional pieces of flatware according to whether or not they’ll be needed during the meal—which is why a 5-piece place setting is essential.

Shop Eve Brushed Stainless Steel 5-Piece Flatware Set here.

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  • Glassware: Always festive glassware belongs above the knife. If you include a cup and saucer, keep it farthest to the right, above the spoon(s), with the wine and/or water glasses to its left.

Shop Toyo Glassware here.

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  • Napkin: The napkin will either match or play very nicely with the rest of your table linens. It usually belongs underneath the fork or on the plate, for a more informal setting.

Shop napkins here.

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  • Serveware: You know what you’re serving. Now, decide how to present it. Whether you’re planning a causal, buffet-style meal or passing dishes around the dining table family style, every serving piece has the potential to make a beautiful statement. Set your selected platters, bowls, and other serving pieces out in advance, and think about labeling them with post-it notes, so you remember what goes where when that harried all-the-food’s-ready-now moment arrives.

Shop Terra.Cotto Cookware here.

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Shop Galvin Black Serve Set here.

  • Tablecloth, runner, or placemats: Did we save the best for last? If the dinner plate is the star of the show, then this is your show’s theme song—the one you can’t get out of your head long after the party’s over. You’ll probably select this element first, so choose wisely and pair well. If you go with a bold and busy runner, keep your hard elements clean and crisp. If you select a simple, monotone tablecloth, you’ll have more flexibility to get creative with your other elements.
  1. Have fun

Speaking of getting creative, don’t forget the fun. Once you’ve covered the bases with your basic items, it’s time to infuse the table with your own sense of style—and any elements appropriate to the occasion.

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In the spirit of modern design, we’d still encourage you to opt for gorgeous simplicity here. Remember that more is not always more, but don’t be afraid to be a bit brave or funny as you add the finishing touches.

Anything can work at center table—from a bouquet-filled collection of stilettos to a single, glowing candle. Just keep it crisp, clean, and classy, and you’ve got a recipe for style success.

Watch our step by step video How To Set A Table here:

Bon appetite!

 

 

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Inn Style: Unison + Longman & Eagle

Our latest bedding is custom-made for a Chicago destination that’s anything but ordinary.

We’ve been told our bedding is perfect for guest rooms, and Chicago’s iconic Inn at Longman & Eagle agrees. It now features Unison special-edition bedding that was created as a collaboration between Cody Hudson (partner at Land and Sea Department, which owns and operates the Inn at Longman & Eagle) and Unison co-founder Robert Segal.

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You can purchase the bedding, a quilt that reverses from navy blue to light grey, online or in or store. But we hope you’ll visit the Inn, too, to see it in its native environment. The Inn features six small eclectic rooms and sits above a whiskey bar serving Michelin-star-rated food. Inside each room: a mix of furniture designed and built by Land and Sea partners Mode Carpentry, plus curated artwork by Stephen Eichhorn, Ryan Duggan and other noteworthy creatives.

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We caught up with Cody, who shared more about this unique Chicago destination and what makes its new Unison bedding such a special touch.

Unison: You’ve had a longstanding collaborative relationship with Unison. What made the bedding the natural next step?

Cody: We’ve been using Unison bedding at the Inn since we opened. We like to support local companies so Unison was a perfect fit. After a few years of using the bedding we thought it could be interesting to do more of a custom comforter for the rooms.

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Unison: What were some key things you kept in mind when creating the design?

Cody: [We wanted] something simple, clean and a little utilitarian that would hold up in an inn setting. Also, there’s a lot going on in the rooms already so we wanted something with some color and pattern but not too much.

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Unison: These aren’t your typical hotel rooms. What’s the vibe?

Cody: It’s a pretty casual experience, almost like staying at a friend’s house who has a really cool guest room and has great taste in music, art and whiskey.

Unison: Another one of your collaborations with Unison, the Anchors bedding, was based on your hand-drawn illustrations. Tell us about your process for the Longman & Eagle bedding.

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Cody: I had a few meetings with [Unison co-founders] Robert and Alicia and talked about what fabrics would work best and what would go with the sheets and pillowcases we were going to use. We landed on this clean combination.

Unison: All beds at the Inn will also have the Sailor pillowcases. Why go with these?

Cody: We wanted the colors on the comforter to work nicely with everything else on the bed — it was a good fit.

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Unison: Tell us a bit more about your own studio practice. What’s your main focus and any new evolutions as of late?

Cody: I split my time between Land and Sea Department projects, traditional graphic design work and working on my personal art in the studio. In my personal work I’ve been focusing on more abstracted paintings on linen as well as steel and wood sculptures. I spent the last two months painting quite a bit getting ready for a few shows but now I’m back pretty heavily focusing on a few new LSD projects in the works.

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Unison: Where else can people see your work?

Cody: I had a show at Andrew Rafacz Gallery in Chicago last month, I’m doing a small show of sculptures in Amsterdam in December at Mini Gallerie. I’m slowly working towards a few other painting shows later next year as well as wrapping up details on a few mural projects for later in the year. That and raising two young kids is keeping me pretty busy right now.

Want to learn more? Click here for a peek inside The Inn at Longman & Eagle. Or, get immediate gratification and shop the new L&E Reversible Quilt here.